Chocolate Chip Blondies - Better Batter Gluten Free Flour

Chocolate Chip Blondies

This super easy blondie recipe combines the buttery flavor and chocolate chips from everyone’s favorite cookies with the appealing texture of brownies. One of my favorite go-to recipes for a last minute dessert, these […]

This super easy blondie recipe combines the buttery flavor and chocolate chips from everyone’s favorite cookies with the appealing texture of brownies. One of my favorite go-to recipes for a last minute dessert, these blondies are made with pantry staples for the nights when you need a quick treat and they come together in a snap – no mixer needed! Try a mix of chocolate chip and nut flavors, make them with cinnamon chips to make a snickerdoodle-type bar cookie, or leave out the nuts altogether – they are delicious no matter the mix-in combination you choose. Cut them in bigger squares and top with ice cream for a guest-worthy dessert.

1 stick unsalted butter, or non dairy margarine, melted
1/3 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 egg (you may use 1/4 c chia or flax gel instead)
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 tsp salt (omit if using salted nuts)
1 cup (4oz or 140g) Better Batter Gluten Free Flour
2 cups mix-ins (milk or semi-sweet chocolate chips, cinnamon chips, peanut butter chips, roasted nuts, etc), divided (you may omit nuts if allergic. If making non dairy bars, we recommend Enjoy Life chocolate chunks)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Combine melted butter or non dairy margarine and sugar in a large mixing bowl and whisk well to combine. Add egg (or substitute), vanilla, and salt (if using); mix well. Add Better Batter flour and stir in using a spatula until almost completely combined. Add half of the desired mix-ins (for instance chocolate chips and nuts), mixing completely.

Cut two strips of parchment paper to line a 8×8 square metal pan, leaving extra on the sides to use as handles. Spray lightly with cooking spray. Spread the blondie batter into an even layer on top of the parchment-lined pan. Top with remaining mix-insBlondies.

Bake 17-20 minutes or until lightly golden. Cool in pan and using paper handles, pull from pan and place on a cutting board. Remove parchment then cut into 16 pieces.

4 Responses

  1. stephcp

    This recipe did not work for me. Burnt on the top, raw on the bottom. Baked them for 40 minutes?? I spent money on this gluten free flour hoping it would make a difference. I have seen no great improvement. Maybe it’s because I am baking at a higher elevation.

    • Naomi
      Naomi

      Hi Steph!

      Baking at a higher elevation absolutely changes a LOT about a recipe. My guess is this is your primary problem with recipes not turning out right.

      I am attaching a list of suggested changes to recipes based on higher elevation. Make changes
      one at a time. One change may be all that is necessary. In general, you
      should keep modifications on the small side the first time you prepare a
      recipe, and adjust as needed subsequently.

      Because air pressure decreases as the elevation increases, many foods
      respond differently at high altitudes — and not just baked goods, but
      beans, stews, fried foods, pasta, etc. There are some standard
      adjustments you can make, but you also have to experiment a bit to find
      what adjustments work best for your recipes where you are.

      For both cakes and cookies, raise the oven temperature by 20-25°
      to set the batter before the cells formed by the leavening gas expand too
      much, causing the cake or cookies to fall, and slightly shorten the
      cooking time. You should NOT use this tip when baking with glass or
      stonewear, however.

      Cake pans should be filled only half way as opposed to 2/3 full, as this
      allows the structure to set better and for proper rise to occur without
      collapse.

      For yeast breads: Basic recipes for yeast breads are reliable at most
      altitudes. However, since fermentation of sugar is faster at higher
      altitudes, breads rise in one-third the time noted for lower altitudes.
      When baking yeast breads, carefully watch that the dough does not rise
      more than double its bulk.

      Flour tends to be drier at high elevation, so increase the amount of
      liquid in the recipe by 2 to 3 tablespoons for each cup of flour called
      for at 5,000 feet, and by 3 to 4 tablespoons at 7,000 ft.

      It may also be helpful in yeast breads instead of increasing liquid to
      decrease flour by about 25%.

      For cookies, you will probably want to adjust the sugar or baking powder:
      Most cookie recipes yield acceptable results at high altitude, but can be
      improved by slightly increasing baking temperature. Cookies with lots of
      chocolate, nuts or fruit may need a reduction of baking powder/soda by up
      to half. Often, cookie recipes contain a higher proportion of sugar and
      fat than necessary. Up to one-fourth of the sugar can be replaced with
      nonfat dry milk without loss in quality.

      IN general:

      With less air pressure weighing them down, leavening agents tend to work
      too quickly at higher altitudes, so by the time the food is cooked, most
      of the gasses have escaped, producing your flat tire. For cakes leavened
      by egg whites, beat only to a soft-peak consistency to keep them from
      deflating as they bake.

      To offset this tendency, extra protein can be helpful, and it may usually
      behelpful to substitute extra large eggs anywhere large eggs are called
      for in recipes.

      Also, decrease the amount of baking powder or soda
      in your recipes by 15% to 25% (one-eighth to one quarter teaspoon per
      teaspoon specified in the recipe) at 5,000 feet, and by 25% or more at
      7,000.

      Flour tends to be drier at high elevation, so increase the amount of
      liquid in the recipe by 2 to 3 tablespoons for each cup of flour called
      for at 5,000 feet, and by 3 to 4 tablespoons at 7,000 ft.

      Often you will want to decrease the amount of sugar in a recipe (for each
      cup decrease up to 2 tablespoons at 6,000 feet, 1 to 3 tablespoons for
      7,000 feet or higher)

      On the non-baking front, because water boils at a lower temperature the
      higher you go (212° at sea level, 203° at 5,000 feet, 198° at 7,500 feet),
      foods cooked in water have to be cooked substantially longer to get them
      done. Pasta needs a furious boil and longer time. Beans need to be cooked
      twice as long at 7,000 feet, and above that height, it’s nearly impossible
      to cook them through without the use of a pressure cooker (which raises
      the boiling point of water). Slow stews and braises may need an hour extra
      for every 1,000 feet you live above 4,000 feet.

      We hope this helps you in some way – remember it is essential to keep all
      variables the same and begin by adjusting only one variable at a time.
      High altitude baking can vary depending on altitude and humidity and your
      region will require very specific adjustments! Once noted, these should
      work universally when adjusting recipes while baking in your area.

  2. Isy

    Delicious! I followed the recipe like it was posted, it was easy and good, only lasted a few hours. I will double the recipe next time! Thank you for the great recipe that I can make again and no one will know its gluten free!

  3. kacountrydecor

    Delicious!! I doubled it and cooked it in a 9×13 pan because an 8×8 just wasn’t going to cut it with a family of 5! Took around 30 minutes and they were DELICIOUS!! You can’t even tell they are gluten free!!

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